Me-now-in-OZ … Revelation: part the second...

Yesterday I teased you with the idea of history on my doorstep, so to speak.

Today let me share with you what I discovered.  The photographs of the boards do the hard work for me!!  I shall preface this by saying that we have a major road in Hornsby, (which was once a sole settlement and considered remote, but is now a Northern suburb of the Sydney metropolis), which is called Edgeworth David Avenue.

I was aware that this was the name of a local dignitary. I even asked about the name to Hornsby-born natives.  Nobody could tell me anything more than that he was 'an explorer'.

To be honest, anyone who settled Australia before the turn of the 20th Century could be classified as an explorer, a squatter or a bush-ranger!  So I suppose I didn't take that explanation altogether as seriously as I might.


Imagine my pleasure, then, in finding these informational boards dotted around the park...

"this property was the home of the renowned Australian Geologist, Sir Tannatt William Edgeworth David, his wife Caroline and their family for over 20 years from 1920"







THE HOUSE/PROPERTY IS CALLED "CORINGAH"






















(Hope you can manage to read this without my needing to retype!)




































































































This one essentially tells you what can be found in the Wiki entry which I have hyperlinked above. It's a lovely wee monument, though, in the centre of the reserve, surrounded by this...

























...and tomorrow there will be more views!!

6 comments:

  1. That is interesting, such a fascinating man too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have to confess that, despite calling myself a geologist, I had not heard of Edgeworth David before. What a full life he had, according to his Wikipedia entry. His garden look most enticing.
    Cheers, Gail.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Imagine you having to go back there, almost as a tourist from India, to learn about this geologist and Antarctic adventurer. Isn't it a good thing you did? He certainly led a more than full life despite his periods of invalidism.
    Fascinating (despite how I feel about coal, this being an almost entirely different world now).
    K

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very interesting and great history. How are you feeling?

    ReplyDelete
  5. A true treasure! And I was able to read it all as well. Looking forward to more views!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hari OM
    Thanks all!! Gail, I think too many folk of note disappear from the memory, so you cannot be blamed for not knowing of him...as Kay points out, it took for me to return as 'tourist' to find this out!!!

    ReplyDelete

Have your say...the cloud is listening.
Meanwhile I will put the kettle on: if you ask a question it will be answered.
So be sure to check back!!!

For personal contact, please use the email box on the Wild YAM/Contact page.