Menoffagainorrhea [me-noff-again-or-rhea]; the condition of the endless traveller

Aitch was waiting patiently at Stowmarket station, where I arrived two hours later than the planned time.  Despite the weather on the way down, here it was mild and dry. Lady Victoria was happy to see us home and baked potatoes were done to perfection ready for immediate consumption.

The gloomy forecast that we had heard from Christmas day proved to be all bluff and bluster; at least in East Anglia.  Saturday dawned bright and beautiful and again very mild. 

The day was spent peaceably and doing various personal tasks.  It was so perfect an afternoon, though, I took myself off for a walk down the lane.  Needless to say, I had the 'Nik' on!!

copyright Yamini Ali MacLean
This low sun betrays the fact it is still only 2pm...

There was an icy feel to the air, but it was clear and glorious.  I didn't even have a coat on.

Aitch's home backs onto this farmland and to my left is the church of which she is warden. I climbed the rise into the field behind it and got the best of the dropping sun for photography here.


copyright Yamini Ali MacLean



St Peter's (a name common to many churches round here) has many time periods within it's building.  The tower is 14th century and whilst the base of the rest of it must date from then also, much of the existing form dates from Victorian 'overhaul' and some 17th century intervention.

Construction is of the flint and mortar in "proudwork" style, where the flints project from the base material. This can be seen in the following shot.


copyright Yamini Ali MacLean





It is easy to see from this, too, how the flints can be very sharp and why they would have been used as tools and weapons in much earlier times.









copyright Yamini Ali MacLean


This detail of one of the window's in Baylham St Peter's shows a decoration over it's arch which demonstrates another form of laying flint called "flushwork".  The flint is knapped and laid smooth and in line with the base material.















...okay I know it's not everyone's cuppa, the architectural detail, but I am sure you can appreciate the effect...

copyright Yamini Ali MacLean






I headed back to the house, doing some experimental imagery along the way.















That was Saturday 28th out of the way.

6 comments:

  1. Lovely photos, even if I do say so, hehehe.

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  2. Amazing we call buildings old if they are over 100 years here nothing like that tower, I think it beautiful.
    Merle.............

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  3. Sorry I'm leaving s's off things lately
    Merle...........

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  4. And I have no firm grasp of all your centuries of workmanship, but I appreciate the grandeur and the loveliness of it.

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  5. Hari OM
    Thanks ladies; a few more of this sort coming up...

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  6. The churches here are mainly of wood and the one church that is made of brick, is made of just that: brick. Albeit a red/pinkish brick and looking quite pretty, it's nothing like the church in your photos.

    ReplyDelete

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