Menooooooopsadaisy....

Fuzzy head-and-shoulders photo of a 40-year-old man in a cloth cap and mustache.
G. V. Hudson invented modern DST,
proposing it first in 1895
Here in the British Isles, the clocks sprung forward over the weekend. It is a subject which the world-over gets debated. It seems we may have to blame either or all of 
A standing man in three-piece suit, facing camera. He is about 60 and is bald with a mustache. His left hand is in his pants pocket, and his right hand is in front of his chest, holding his pocket watch.
William Willett
independently proposed
DST in 1907 and
advocated it tirelessly
A) a New Zealand bug catcher (Hudson)
B) an English golfer (Willett)
C) wars or 
D) energy crisis
none of which are particularly relevant today, at least not in original context. 

The first two were just daylight greedy - wanting to manipulate things to suit their personal pursuits.

During the war years the argument and application was used in respect to saving energy from coal consumption (mostly).  One might perhaps allow for that.  The same argument was again used in the 1970's, wherein the other fossil fuel, oil, was the treasured product.  The continued application of daylight savings is based on virtually the same arguments.  However, it struck me that folk utilise power so very differently these days, not to mention that we are improving (though having far to go) in utilising better practice for consumption as well as alternative fuels.  I am sure there are many learned articles on the matter, but for those who want to read a bit more about this please 

On my side, I am ambivalent.  It makes little or no difference to me whether I have the daylight at the start or the end of the day. It only ever comes down to us using what we have creatively and productively.  Do I enjoy the extended summer evenings?  Of course. Would I be lost and sad if they weren't there?  Of course not.  As much as it can be inconvenient, I refuse to be terrorised by Time.


6 comments:

  1. Arguments about daylight savings seem to me ridiculous - after all, nothing will change the actual amount of daylight available at any time of year in any given place. The English politicians who are always suggesting keeping daylight savings in winter never seem to recommend the obvious alternative, that work, school etc. should start and finish earlier, if lighter evenings are the goal.
    Ok. Rant over!
    Gail.

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  2. Daylight savings or no, standard time is an artificial concept, probably devised to keep trains on schedule. There are four time zones in the continental United States, and the only sane place to live is pretty much in the middle of the zone. One winter I was in Boston and realized it was dark at four in the afternoon. But of course, it is so far east in the time zone. What an awful place to live, cheated out of an hour of daylight at the end of every day.

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  3. I don't mind what they do, it makes no difference to my days are lazy and relaxed and half the time I'm not sure what day it is, time just goes out the window.
    Merle..........

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  4. Does Australia have summer and winter time as well?

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  5. Hari OM
    Yes, Mara, the South-Eastern states and New Zealand also... As you all note it really doesn't make all that much difference at all but governments are determined animals!!

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  6. The major annoyance to me is having to change all the clocks in the house twice a year. One doesn't realize how many there are until the change is made. Other than that it doesn't bother me that much.

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