Me-Now-Views; Less Speak More Peek

Well, other than the dismal day of non-photographing last Monday, the Fudge has been quite busy in other areas. Today let me share some more from the trip to the Borders to visit the old farm. 'Hawksnest' is now owned by others, but Uncle A retained two paddocks for himself. One is pretty much used up for the house that was built for retirement, (sadly, Aunty P did not live so long to truly enjoy it), and the other to keep a few beasts or to rent out for forage to his neighbours. The cows and their calves which are there just now belong to his son-in-law.

Up on the back hill, some of the farmland has a strange herd... (seriously, biggfy it for full effect.) this is a panorama shot, so you are actually seeing the road ahead, and the road just travelled!
























































'Hawksnest' was classified as LFA (Less Favoured Area) as it has a substantial area of heathland and sits above 1000m. Grandad and granny took a government smallholding lease there after WW2. He was a shepherd, and much of the farm was given to sheep. He grew his own hay and straw for feed and bedding for the small number of cattle he kept in addition.  As Uncle A came to the farm, more cattle were kept and less sheep, a pig or two, geese...

A hard life. The old piece of tree here once stood where the new house is.


























The new house is behind the trees. The rooves you see are from the original homestead; there was an older 'new' house which was built higher up the hill and further along the road when Grandad and granny bought the farm from government... the keepers of the old steading appear not to be up on building maintenance...



























Uncle A is in his 70's now, but has continued his money-making skill of drystone walling (dyking); this one is for his own garden though.

He howks out the 'stanes' from the ground with the tractor hoe.  Then finds them their rightful place in the structure. One may think that piling stones is as easy as rockfall.

Maybe... However, making it strong and pretty is quite a skill.




Roses on the outside of the conservatory.

Tomatoes on the inside...
Willowherb in the hedges.























































The wild raspberries were delicious!!! After we left the farm, Little Ren took father and myself up to Soutra. More on that next LSMP...


11 comments:

  1. That looks beautiful! It amazes mom how as a child she did not appreciate these settings but as an adult loves them immensely!

    Your Pals,

    Murphy & Stanley

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  2. That log seem immense! I am sorry the stone outbuilding is deteriorating. And finally, I think dry stonewalling is a treasure. I love looking at it, and see so little.

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  3. What awesome pics - my grandfather was scottish and I mist admit to having a longing to see where her grew up and finding out if he had any family left living there

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  4. What gorgeous scenery..I just love all the green!!

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  5. Love seeing the turbine windmill field. Round hay a not much seen around me, you have to go south into Kentucky. Round bales are harder to handle than square bales but compress the hay more tightly. Love seeing the farm. We have a stone wall along our driveway and I sure could use your uncle now. I think your countryside has more shades of green then here in Ohio.
    Thanks for being a friend
    Sweet William The Scot

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  6. Those pictures make me want to stand in that field and just breathe in fresh air. And taste wild raspberries, of course!

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  7. Those pictures are so nice. Mommy is from Wisconsin and some of them reminded her of there. She is drooling for the raspberries.

    Ziggy Out!!

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  8. Raspberries. I have some in my garden, but I think I will have to go out walking again to get the wild ones. There are plenty of bushes close by and if I pick enough, I can make raspberry jam!

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    Replies
    1. Hari Om
      Uncle A thought that is what i would do with these ones - but half didn't make it back to Edinburgh as they were too delicious fresh; the rest just got macerated with sugar and added to cereal for a couple of mornings - and then finally into the milkshake after the big walk!!! Yxx

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  9. Such beautiful vistas!
    They brought over all sorts of stone masons here, as you know, it's a wonderful skill. They're teaching it at the college, too.
    What a trip back in time! xx

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  10. What a beautiful place ~ love stone walls created by hand ~ Lovely photography ~ thanks for sharing your visit ~

    Happy Week to you,
    artmusedog and carol

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