Menotripsical; BAR and Beyond - Of Gardens, Townships and Markets

June 17th and 18th are covered today.

You will have gathered by now that the garden area round Joanne's house is a haven for an abundance of life.  One of her great joys of recent years has been the development of a small(ish), but very varied, flower border outside the house and decking. One of my joys on this visit was to finally see all these delights for myself, after so many tales and photographs seen online.

It will be every bit the joy to watch the new garden develop.

A focal point which cannot be transplanted though, is the mighty oak tree.

Most of us, I think, hold some respect for trees and their sentinel qualities. To have a single tree on one's own property to which one can unburden, is a special privilege. (There was one such in my own yard back in OZ... still miss it...)

Even this magnificent specimen, however, was not immune to the invasion of the 17-year cicadas. Whilst I was having fun with the little bugs, there were certainly plague numbers and this told on all the surrounding foliage, with the ends of branches on all shrubs and trees turning brown from lack of sap, then droopping.

Mother Nature has her way...

There are, in addition to all the plantings, a variety of 'installations' on the border. Delightful little eye-candies. This glass globe was a favourite of mine. Others held great structural interest and most also doubled as garden supports.











The morning of the 18th brought stormy weather. Mini-tornado style. As we drove towards the library we passed the Town Hall and noticed a lot of activity there. Joanne, being the town clerk, could not resist pulling in to see what was what...


Ron the Roads Man was busy on grounds maintenance - that is to say, clearing up the tree which had been felled by the storm - and the one which got felled by the felled tree... think dominoes. It was being dealt with quickly and efficiently.


For those of you interested in the history of settlements, Boston webpage has a good little history. The pictures page is made up of Joanne's images.

Laura had books to drop, so we 'dropped' with her to the library - another great wee place. ...I oughtta mention that we visited two of the three art galleries in the town that morning too; obtained a pretty pair of hand-made earrings from one.  Peninsula is my kinda town.


Saturday we drove down to Worthington, in the greater Columbus area, to see Emily and Linda, the weaver of rugs. Boy are they beautiful... I had to keep my hands well under control and remind myself I was travelling hand-luggage only... but boy they are beautiful.......


On the road I spotted the biggest bird I had seen in a while.

When we stopped for fuel, I looked out the car window and spotted this little scene full of juxtaposition between old and new; cart v. car, home-cooked v. mass produced...

Then it was home and the obligatory evening deck-sit. The Solstice moon was rising... and there were critters in the clouds. Oh, and the obligatory cicada or 87...



8 comments:

  1. What an absolutely beautiful little town! And we agree with the above comment!

    Your Pals,

    Murphy & Stanley

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  2. Peninsula sounds like my kind of town too. I had never heard of it until I read your BAR itinerary.
    Hugs Cecilia

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  3. Great collection of images. I love the big bird and the hummer. The flowers and mosaic tiles are pretty. A lovely place to visit. Happy Monday, enjoy your new week ahead!

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  4. it's always sad when a tree ends in a storm :O( but I love this place... it's a town I could call home immediately... this place says "welcome" somehow :o)

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  5. Another wonderful visit. The gift that keeps on giving! That cicada is amazing. Ours are just black! xx I have to look it up on the map, again...sigh.

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  6. Such lovely gardens at your friend's home. Did you enjoy the mini tornado? Nothing like everyone pulling out the stops for a YAM visit! janice xx

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  7. Amish buggy we love them. I told you that you probably would see them heading north from Nati. We love waking up to the clippity clop of the horses pulling the buggy. We have been through Worthington going across to Dover, Ohio. You would have loved seeing Werthers Knives Museum. The miniature carvings are unbelievable ~ he carved Lincoln's memorial train down to the little key that locked the train door. His tree was in Ripley's. http://thewarthermuseum.com/
    The rugs are truly beautiful such a talent.
    Sweet William The Scot

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