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What You See Is What You Get. This is a journal blog, an explore-blog, a bit of this and that blog. Sharing where the mood takes me. Perhaps it will take you too.

Menoculayshunal; A Moment Of Inattention...

Well, dear readers, you have stuck with me through the retelling of the Canine Chronicles, the thinly disguised semi-fictional stories about the ashram dogs that I grew to know and love. If anybody did
not
click to it, the 'strange amma' to the dogs was, of course, myself. Unidog is the language not just of grunts and woofs but of teeth, tail, ears and fur; it is a sign-language of sorts, a language of subtlety and fraught with misunderstandings - even among dogs.

Now, with ten years distance (...how did it get to be so far ago?), I am ready to complete these chronicles and bring it round to the next, deeper stages of being on the ashram and living the life of a sadhvi. (Males are sadhus, females sadhvis - renunciates.) You see, there were lessons to be learned...

First, though, the question was asked about the de-fleaing project. In truth, I had argued quite strongly against interventions with Radha's pups. The same attention had not been paid to the puppies of B1 and B2. It was simply that Radha was adored due to her good looks and gentle nature. However, "Uncle" (Krishna-bhai - and no, not the dog, one of the brothers!) had taken a real notion for the pups and started feeding them and getting ever more devoted to them. There was no drawing him away from it. So, when word came to me that he was using a disinfectant on them, I could no longer keep my impartiality. If it was to be done, let it be done safely and methodically. Amazingly, our Sanskrit acharya, Samvid-ji, was on board with this. Between the three of us, it took several hours with buckets, old toothbrushes, lots of old sheets and a very diluted solution of disinfectant to douse the pups, brush the fleas from them and into the water to drown. It was labour intensive, and I could not take photos in the process. I then advised that a daily wipe-over with the very dilute fluid would help maintain the flea-free condition. 

Then a trap was laid for me. Perhaps a strong way of putting it, but with hindsight, I see the pitfall. 

There is the legend; King Bharata reached the age of sannyas (70+) and surrendered the throne and all riches to his son, taking himself off to the forest, by a river, building a kutiya (cottage) and living on foraged fruits and roots. His remaining days were to be spent in this saadhana of austerity and meditation, seeking moksha. He spent several years thus and was doing well when along came a deer, pursued by a lion. To save herself, the doe jumped the river, which the lion could not. However, it caused her to bring forth the fawn she was carrying, after which she died. The fawn slipped into the river, and the sadhu could not bear to see it thus. He rescued the little one and spent time feeding and caring for it. This was an act of Love, an act of karma, and caused him to interrupt his saadhana. As time went on, he grew ever more attached to the now-grown doe and could not fully focus upon meditation. He found that he would fret for its welfare and worried about how it would fare in his absence... which inevitably came. On his deathbed, he was more concerned for the deer than for his own spiritual purpose and thus lost his chance in this life to gain freedom from the cycle of life and death. He had to be reborn, and when he was, he came as a deer.

In that moment of inattention after the clean-up session, I listened as Samvid-ji wondered whether the little girl-dog might make a desirable pet. We wondered if some among the ashram devotees might be interested or know of someone who would be willing to adopt.

In that moment of inattention... I made the decision to separate Rekha from the pack and house-train her. This was foolish for so many reasons.

In that moment of inattention, I became responsible not only for that one wee pup but answerable to my own spiritual purpose, to Acharya-ji and also to the ashram population. I became, as did Jada Bharata, caught in the immediacy of life in such a way that my path became broken, and there would be consequences.

...to be continued...


16 comments:

  1. Interesting to note that love and caring for animals could dent one's spirituality.

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    1. Hari OM
      ...not dent the spirituality, but delay its progress... Yxx

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  2. Lovely little puppies. I hope they have a good life.
    Coffee is on and stay safe

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  3. The care of an animal is a personal commitment. I guess we see where this is going.

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  4. sometimes this h moments happen, but often they happened for a reason and we see a little later why ;O)

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  5. I am curious now to learn how this apparently caring act lead to 'consequences'.

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  6. Ooh, now there's a cliffhanger! For now I am on the pup's side though...

    Klem

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  7. Our house felt totally empty after our Lexi passed. I can't imagine living the rest of my life without a good dog by my side.

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  8. in all of my 77 years I have only live 3 years without a dog and it was horrid. age 36 to 38, alone in an apartment with no dog and no people. I hated every moment of it. i had to fight my dad to have a dog, but mother was on my side and he gave in, no house training though, the deal was i could have one dog if I did not bring it in the house. not to say Joey NEVER came in the house, just NOT when daddy was there. waiting to see what consequences happens

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  9. I surely understand even when one has lived with a cat whose sweet paws make no noise their quiet presence is missed.
    Hugs Cecilia

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  10. It's so difficult to resist the temptations of a puppy. We hope it turns out well for the little four-legged one.

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  11. Ah! House training...You may have delayed your spirituality, but think of what you have done in raising the puppy's and the (eventual) caretakers. It is never lost, just redistributed.

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  12. So easily we become distracted. namaste, janice xx

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  13. We through on this teaching for a while and wondered what would happen to the world if everyone in it exercised their right to pursue their spiritual interest to the exclusion of all other cares and interests. Would that make us a population of self-centred individuals, not prepared to form attachments to, or care for, anyone or anything else? xxx mr T and F

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    1. Hari Om
      This will be expanded upon - but it is very important to understand that it is not the caring that need be avoided... it is the attachment that arises... Yxx

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